AWARDS

Unit Awards



Click the document below to view the MUC approval process.


 

Personal Awards

The criteria for the personal awards may be found at http://www.marines.mil/Marines/CombatAwards.aspx

CAP 1-3-9 Personal Awards


Navy Cross


 
HM3 Dewey Ray Burns, Jr.*

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Third Class Dewey Ray Burns, Jr. United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism on 13 September 1969 as a Corpsman serving with the Combined Action Platoon 1-3-9, III Marine Amphibious Force, during operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. During a concentrated enemy attack upon the village of An Phong in Quang Ngai Province, Petty Officer Burns, on several occasions, charged across fire-swept terrain, rendered medical aid to wounded civilians and defending soldiers and Marines, and carried them to positions of safety. On one occasion, Petty Officer Burns was directly responsible for saving the lives of his patients when he defeated an enemy soldier in hand-to-hand combat. Observing that the platoon's interpreter was wounded and had fallen in the direct line of fire of enemy machine guns, Petty Officer Burns directed nearby Marines to provide covering fire and raced to the side of the casualty. Although he, himself, was seriously wounded while treating the fallen interpreter, he resolutely continued his lifesaving actions until he had stopped his patient's bleeding. He then commenced leading his charge toward a location of relative security, but was mortally wounded before he could attain his objective. Petty Officer Burns' valiant and determined actions served to inspire the other members of his platoon to heroic efforts, resulting in the complete routing of the enemy. By his intrepid fighting spirit, daring initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty, he succeeded in saving several lives, and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

General Orders: Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Action Date: 13-Sep-69
Service: Navy
Rank: Hospitalman Third Class
Company: Corpsman (Attached), Combined Action Platoon 1-3-9
Division: III Marine Amphibious Force
  

 * Posthumously

http://militarytimes.com/citations-medals-awards/recipient.php?recipientid=4165

Navy Cross Award Criteria

Awarded to a person who, while serving in any capacity with the Navy or Marine Corps, distinguishes himself by extraordinary heroism not justifying the Medal of Honor

(1) while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States;
(2) while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or
(3) while serving with friendly foreign forces in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

To warrant this distinctive decoration, the act or the execution of duty must be performed in the presence of great danger or at great personal risk and must be performed in such a manner as to set the individual apart from his shipmates or fellow Marines. An accumulation of minor acts of heroism does not justify the award. The high standards demanded must be borne in mind when recommending the award.


Silver Star


 

Sgt. Michael Murphy

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Michael Alfred Murphy, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Senior Advisor/Marine Squad Leader of Combined Action Platoon I-3-9, III Marine Amphibious Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 13 September 1969, a battalion of the Twenty-fire North Vietnamese Army Regiment, utilizing mortars, automatic weapons, and small arms attacked the village of An Phong in Quang Ngai Province, which was defended by Combined Action Platoon 1-3-9. Quickly analyzing the situation, Sergeant Murphy rallied his men and led an aggressive counterattack which forced the numerically superior enemy force to temporarily withdraw. While adjusting and coordinating supporting Marine artillery fire missions and helicopter gunship strikes against the disorganized enemy force, he simultaneously led a series of assaults which inflicted heavy casualties on the hostile unit. With the coming of dawn, Sergeant Murphy led a search and destroy operation in the area surrounding the village in an attempt to recover the body of a mortally wounded Marine and to prevent the North Vietnamese from reorganizing for subsequent attacks. Skillfully maneuvering through sections of the village still held by the enemy, he located the mortally wounded Marine near an enemy stronghold and in order to retrieve his comrade, directed a spirited attack against the stronghold which resulted in the deaths of three additional hostile soldiers and the recovery of the fallen Marine. Completely disregarding his own safety, he moved throughout the fire-swept area shouting instructions and encouragement and directing the fire of his Marines and Popular Forces soldiers against the withdrawing enemy. When the enemy force counterattacked, Sergeant Murphy directed additional helicopter strikes on them and personally covered the evacuation of casualties to more tenable locations with accurate machine gun fire, accounting for more North Vietnamese soldiers killed. By his courage, fold fighting spirit, selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, Sergeant Murphy inspired all who served with him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.

Action Date: September 13, 1969
Service: Marine Corps
Rank: Sergeant
Company: Combined Action Platoon I-3-9
Division: III Marine Amphibious Force
http://militarytimes.com/citations-medals-awards/recipient.php?recipientid=40855

 

L/Cpl. Rick Sherrill*

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lance Corporal Richard W. Sherrill, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Combined Action Platoon 1-3-9, III Marine Amphibious Force in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 13 September 1969, a battalion of the Twenty-First North Vietnamese Army Regiment, utilizing mortars, automatic weapons, and small arms, attacked the village of An Phong in Quang Ngai Province, which was defended by Combined Action Platoon 1-3-9. In an effort to pinpoint the location of the enemy command post located within the village, Lance Corporal Sherrill fearlessly led a reconnaissance patrol consisting of Marines and Popular Forces soldiers into the enemy-controlled section of the village. Completely disregarding his own safety, he maneuvered to within twenty-five meters of a hut in which the leaders of the hostile unit were discussing their battle plans. Alertly observing a North Vietnamese sentry preparing to fire on his comrades, Lance Corporal Sherrill quickly killed the hostile soldier and ordered his men to withdraw while he provided covering fire. Although greatly outnumbered, he valiantly fought on in an attempt to prevent the hostile unit, which was now aware of the Marines' presence, from cutting off his companions' avenue of escape, but, while engaged in this selfless task, he was mortally wounded. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unselfish concern for the welfare of his comrades, Lance Corporal Sherrill earned the respect and admiration of all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.

Action Date: 13-Sep-69
Service: Marine Corps
Rank: Lance Corporal
Company: Combined Action Platoon 1-3-9
Division: III Marine Amphibious Force

* Posthumously

http://militarytimes.com/citations-medals-awards/recipient.php?recipientid=41196

 


1Lt. James J. Mulhearn, Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant James J. Mulhearn, Jr., United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer of Combined Action Company 1-3, III Marine Amphibious Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 13 September 1969, a battalion of the Twenty-First North Vietnamese Army Regiment, utilizing mortars, automatic weapons, and small arms, attacked the village of An Phong in Quang Ngai Province, which was defended by Combined Action Platoon 1-3-9. Informed that the beleaguered unit was in need of additional small arms ammunition, First Lieutenant Mulhearn quickly organized and led a reaction force to the battle area. Arriving in the village, he completely disregarded his own safety to ensure that the vitally needed ammunition was expeditiously distributed to the points of heaviest contact. Learning that one Marine was wounded and pinned down in an area dangerously exposed to intense enemy automatic weapons fire, he unhesitatingly led several Marines in an attempt to rescue their comrade. As the Marines approached the courtyard of a school, they came under a heavy volume of hostile fire and were forced to seek shelter in a nearby building. When a rocket-propelled grenade struck the building but failed to wound any of the Marines, First Lieutenant Mulhearn picked up the seriously injured man and carried him across sixty meters of fire-swept terrain as he led his men to a position of relative safety. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty at great personal risk, First Lieutenant Mulhearn earned the respect and admiration of all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.

Action Date: September 13, 1969
Service: Marine Corps
Rank: First Lieutenant
Company: Combined Action Company 1-3
Division: III Marine Amphibious Force
http://militarytimes.com/citations-medals-awards/recipient.php?recipientid=40841

 


Sgt. Robert Wray

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert B. Wray, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Supply Sergeant of Combined Action Company 1-3, III Marine Amphibious Force in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 13 September 1969, a battalion of the Twenty-First North Vietnamese Army Regiment, utilizing mortars, automatic weapons, and small arms, attacked tile village of An Phong, in Quang Ngai Province, which was defended by Combined Action Platoon 1-3-9. Unhesitatingly volunteering to accompany a reaction force formed to reinforce the beleaguered unit and deliver ammunition and other vitally needed supplies, Sergeant Wray subsequently arrived in the battle area and fearlessly maneuvered from one position to another as he supervised the expeditious distribution of the ammunition. Having completed this task, he led an element of the platoon in a daring envelopment of a hostile stronghold. As the friendly unit maneuvered forward, Sergeant Wray alertly observed a squad of enemy soldiers armed with rocket-propelled grenades and automatic weapons. Completely disregarding his own safety, he initiated an assault and single-handedly killed three of the hostile soldiers while his companions accounted for three additional enemy casualties. Locating the North Vietnamese Army units command post, he skillfully coordinated the movement of his men with that of an adjacent friendly element and directed an assault upon the position which resulted in five enemy killed and the destruction of enemy supplies before they could be removed by the retreating forces. By his courage, bold leadership and unwavering devotion to duty at great personal risk, Sergeant Wray was instrumental in his unit accounting for 116 enemy killed and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.

Action Date: 13-Sep-69
Service: Marine Corps
Rank: Sergeant
Company: Combined Action Platoon 1-3-9
Division: III Marine Amphibious Force
http://militarytimes.com/citations-medals-awards/recipient.php?recipientid=24038

Silver Star Award Criteria

Awarded to a person who, while serving in any capacity with the Navy or Marine Corps, is cited for gallantry in action that does not warrant the Medal of Honor or Navy Cross

(1) while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States;
(2) while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or
(3) while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.
The heroic act(s) performed must render the individual conspicuous and well above the standard expected. An accumulation of minor acts of heroism normally does not justify the award, but unusual or exceptional cases will be decided on their merits.

 

Bronze Star



L/Cpl. Mel Avant, PFC Reggie Childs, PFC Sam (Jim) Parker,
PFC Bill Hines, PFC Steve Hicks, and Nugyen But (Interpreter)

(Award citations were not available for inclusion on the site.)

Bronze Star Award Criteria

Awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the armed Forces of the United States, distinguishes himself after 6 December 1941, by heroic or meritorious achievement or service, not involving participation in aerial flight.

(1) while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States;
(2) while engaged in military operation involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or
(3) while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed forces in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

To justify this decoration, accomplishment or performance of duty above that normally expected, and sufficient to distinguish the individual among those performing comparable duties is required, although less than the requirements for the Silver Star or Legion of Merit. Minor acts of heroism in actual combat, single acts of merit or meritorious service connection with military or naval operations may justify this award.

Combat Distinguishing Device. The Combat Distinguishing Device may be authorized.

All were awarded the Combat Distinguishing Device (Combat V)



Navy/Marine Corps Commendation Medal


PFC Gary Holmes, PFC Jerry Meyer,
and PFC David Lummis, PFC James McKnight

(Award citations were not available for inclusion on the site.)

Navy/Marine Corps Commendation Award Criteria

Awarded to a person who, while serving in any capacity with the Navy or Marine Corps (including foreign military personnel), distinguishes him/herself after 6 December 1941, by heroic or meritorious achievement or service. To merit this award, the acts or services must be accomplished or performed in a manner above that normally expected and sufficient to distinguish the individual above those performing similar services, as set forth in the following:

(1) For Acts of Heroism. Worthy of special recognition, but not to the degree required for the Bronze Star Medal when combat is involved or the Navy and Marine Corps Medal when combat is not involved.
(2) For Meritorious Achievement. Outstanding and worthy of special recognition, but not to the degree required for the Bronze Star Medal or Air Medal when combat is involved or the Meritorious Service Medal or Air Medal when combat is not involved. The achievement should be such as to constitute a definite contribution to the naval service, such as an invention, or improvement in design, procedure, or organization.
(3) For Meritorious Service. Outstanding and worthy of special recognition, but not to the degree required for the Bronze Star Medal or Air Medal when combat is involved or the Meritorious Service Medal or Air Medal when combat is not involved. The award may cover an extended period of time during which a higher award may have been recommended or received for specific act(s). The criteria, however, should not be the period of service involved, but rather the circumstances and conditions under which the service was performed. The performance should be well above that usually expected of an individual commensurate with his grade or rate, and above that degree of excellence which can be appropriately reflected in the individuals fitness report or personnel records.

Combat Distinguishing Device. The Combat Distinguishing Device may be authorized.

All were awarded the Combat Distinguishing Device (Combat V)


 

Purple Heart


Arch Sherrill*, Dewey Ray Burns*, and Lt. Col. Hennigan

(Award citations were not available for inclusion on the site.)

Purple Heart Award Criteria

Awarded to members of the Armed Forces of the United States who, while serving under competent authority in any capacity with an Armed Force of the United States after 5 April 1917, has been killed or wounded.

(1) In action against an enemy of the United States.
(2) In action with an opposing armed force of a foreign country in which the Armed Forces of the United States are or have been engaged.
(3) While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.
(4) As the result of an act of any such enemy or opposing armed force.
(5) As the result of an act of any hostile foreign force.
(6) As the result of friendly weapon fire while actively engaging the enemy.
(7) As the indirect result of enemy action. (example: injuries resulting from parachuting from a plane brought down by enemy or hostile fire.)
(8) As the result of maltreatment inflicted by their captors while a prisoner of war.
(9) After 28 March 1973, as a result of international terrorist attack against the U.S. or a foreign nation friendly to the U.S.
(10) After 28 March 1973, as a result of military operations while serving outside the territory of the United States as part of a peacekeeping force.

* Posthumously

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